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Where eagles dare – to eat

Urban Eagle Sightings
Surrey North Delta Leader Where eagles dare – to eat
eagletakeoff.jpg
Hundreds of eagles can be seen at the Vancouver Landfill.
BOAZ JOSEPH PHOTOS / THE LEADER

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Eagle eyes on 520 bridge

Urban Eagle Sightings

06:26 PM PST on Wednesday, March 4, 2009 By DEBORAH FELDMAN / KING 5 News

SEATTLE - You see the traffic backup long before you spot the bird.

The full story is here:

http://www.king5.com/animals/news/stories/NW_030409WAB-eagles-on-520-SW.2ed2cdf.html

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Turtle Bay eagles adapt to urban environment

Urban Eagle Sightings

Turtle Bay eagles adapt to urban environment
By Dylan Darling (Contact)
Thursday, February 19, 2009

• Over the past month, the eagle cam has recorded 93,975 page views, with 7,119 - the most views in one day - on Feb. 10.

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Turtle Bay eagles have three eggs in the nest

Urban Eagle SightingsTurtle Bay eagles have three eggs in the nest
One of the Turtle Bay eagles sits on a trio of eggs this afternoon during ongoing rain, which has partially blurred the image from the California Department of Transportation eagle cam.

California Department of Transportation

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URBAN EAGLES

Urban Eagle SightingsFROM 'VICTORIA NEWS'
Urban eagles June 12, 2008

It’s not uncommon for eagles to go for years without producing any young, such is the case for eagle pairs in Victoria and Esquimalt. File photo

While Victoria and Esquimalt have a single bald eagle nest each, neither mating pair that inhabit the nests have successfully reproduced since 2004.

There are many reasons why the birds, who share a nest with their life-long mate, wouldn’t have any eggs hatch. They might be too old or under nourished. Or there may be some human-made factor, such as pesticides damaging their eggs or nest disturbances.

Gwen Greenwood, volunteer coordinator for the Wildlife Trees Stewardship Program, said somebody would have to monitoring the nests quite closely to know the exact reason they haven’t been productive, and they’d rather not disturb the birds.

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