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41 coyote carcasses discovered in southern Alberta

Planet Earth

Dead Coyotes

The man driving this truck discovered 31 coyotes illegally dumped in front of his farm near Elkwater. (Courtesy: Rick Price)

Updated: Fri Apr. 23 2010 17:28:16

ctvcalgary.ca

Some Alberta residents are raising questions about the province's coyote hunting policy.

This comes after dozens of dead coyotes were found dumped on a roadside near Cypress Provincial Park.

All of the animals were missing a body part and fish and wildlife officers believe bounty seekers may be to blame.

 

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Plastic, pants found in dead whale

Planet Earth

Stomach contents reveal dangers of 'industrial' dining

Image: Plastic found inside whale stomach
Cascadia Research Collective
This plastic bag was among the trash items found inside the gray whale that died on a West Seattle beach.
 
 
msnbc.com staff and news service reports
updated 8:41 a.m. CT, Tues., April 20, 2010

OLYMPIA, Wash. - A gray whale that died after getting stranded on a West Seattle beach had a large amount of garbage in its stomach — ranging from plastic bags to a pair of sweat pants and even a golf ball.

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Bears and deer die at oil sands sites

Planet Earth

 

A tailings pond reflects the Syncrude
oilsands mine facility near Fort McMurray, Alta., Wednesday, July 9,
2008. (Jeff McIntosh / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

A tailings pond reflects the Syncrude oilsands mine facility near Fort McMurray, Alta., Wednesday, July 9, 2008. (Jeff McIntosh / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Updated: Thu Apr. 08 2010 17:49:56

ctvcalgary.ca

 Government documents show that animals other than ducks have died at Alberta's oil sands sites.

Documents obtained by Greenpeace, under freedom of information legislation, show that at least 164 other animals died during oil sands operations between 2000 and 2008.

Those animals included 27 bears, 67 deer, 31 foxes and 21 coyotes.

Possible reasons for the deaths are listed as drowning, oil from tailings, animals hitting structure or vehicles, electrocution, and euthanasia of problem wildlife.

Moose, beavers and wolves also died, although the cause of death isn't specified.

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An oil spill could be ‘catastrophic’ for British Columbia killer whales

Planet Earth

Source: Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Orca population would not survive an ecological incident, researchers say

 

The AT1 population of Alaskan transient killer whales were in Prince William Sound at the time of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. 13 members of the 22 member pod died after the spill and more in the following years. Photo: K.Heise

 

By Nicholas Read, Special To The Sun

March 22, 2010

British Columbia killer whales could become extinct in the long term if an oil spill similar in scope to that from the Exxon Valdez occurred off the coast of B.C., says a conservation biologist with the Universities of Calgary and Manitoba.Paul Paquet, one of the lead scientists on a five-year, 14,000-kilometre survey of marine mammals and sea birds along the coast between 2004 and 2009, says the health of B.C. killer whales is already so fragile thanks to pollution and over-fishing that a major oil spill could devastate them.

The consequences for the population as a whole could be catastrophic, meaning that that population could be pushed over the edge and into a long-term slide to extinction,” Paquet said in an interview. “Given the small population of killer whales and as a population biologist, I don’t think that’s an over-statement. And it is something we should be prepared for.”

Paquet made his remarks to coincide with the release today of a report called What’s at Stake: The Cost of Oil on British Columbia’s Priceless Coast, published by the Raincoast Conservation Society to mark the 21st anniversary of the Exxon Valdez disaster in Prince William Sound, Alaska. ...

To read the rest of this story please visit:

The Raincoast Conservation Foundation

 

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World Water Day sees focus on threatened B.C. lake

Planet Earth

Source: The Vancouver Sun

 By TIFFANY CRAWFORD,

Vancouver Sun

March 22, 2010

Meera Karunananthan, a spokeswoman for the Council of Canadians, standing in front of Fish Lake southwest of Williams Lake. The group is fighting to save the lake from being destroyed by a mining company.
 

Meera Karunananthan, a spokeswoman for the Council of Canadians, standing in front of Fish Lake

southwest of Williams Lake.The group is fighting to save the lake from being destroyed by a mining company.

Photograph by: Brent Patterson, Handout

 

As countries observed World Water Day on Monday, a Canadian group focused on saving a British Columbia fish-bearing lake and nearby creek from destruction.

At a public hearing in Williams Lake, the Ottawa-based Council of Canadians urged a federal review panel to reject a proposed mining project about 200 kilometres southwest of Williams Lake. The hearing was packed by about 300 people.

The proposal is by Vancouver-based Taseko Mines, which says it must destroy a lake and a creek in order to mine a copper-gold deposit.

Taseko says the lake is right beside the deposit and it is not realistic to have the mine and preserve the lake.

Taseko has offered to compensate for the loss of the lake by building an artificial one elsewhere.

But the CAC argues that destroying Fish Lake through the dumping of toxic waste will kill about 85,000 trout, causing a food shortage for first nations.

The group fears the tainted water will also affect salmon because the toxins will contaminate the Taseko River, which connects through a tributary to the Fraser River. ...

 

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