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Adult eagles open nest for rescued young bird

Conservation & Preservation

 

 
 
 
 
Mindy Dick holds an eaglet with an injured leg that was moved and introduced to a different nest in Nanoose Bay, where it has been adopted by the adults.
 

Mindy Dick holds an eaglet with an injured leg that was moved and introduced to a different nest in Nanoose Bay, where it has been adopted by the adults.

Photograph by: Pacific Northwest Raptors LTD., Canwest News Service

A baby eagle that would not have survived on its own has been moved to a new nest in Nanoose Bay, where it has been adopted by two adults with a chick of their own.

A family discovered the injured eaglet on the West Coast Trail late last month. The bird had a sprained leg, likely from falling out of its nest. The family, stranded by bad weather in the boat-accessed area, fed the bird raw hamburger to keep it alive.

 

Read the rest of the story here:

http://www.timescolonist.com/Adult+eagles+open+nest+rescued+young+bird/1795624/story.html

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Bald Eagle goes 'Back to the Wild'

Conservation & Preservation

 

July 2, 2009 Castalia OH

 

FREMONT -- A female Bald Eagle perched next to its nest Wednesday morning, anxiously awaiting the return of its mate following a one-month stay at Back to the Wild rehabilition center in Castalia.

 

The male Bald Eagle who suffered injuries to its wing and a puncture wound to its leg, believed to be the result of a fight with another bird, was found a quarter mile from its nest. The bird fully recovered with the assistance of Mona Rutger, a licensed wildlife rehabilitator and owner of Back to the Wild, as well as Marianne Socha, a veterinarian at Firelands Animal Hospital in Huron.

"It's very difficult to rehabilitate and return a Bald Eagle back to the wild," Rutger said.

A bald eagle that was rehabilitated at Back To The Wild takes to flight following its release on Wednesday.

A bald eagle that was rehabilitated at Back To The Wild takes to flight following its release on Wednesday.

read the rest of story here

 

http://www.thenews-messenger.com/article/20090702/NEWS01/907020312

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Bald eagle healing, will be released soon

Conservation & Preservation

Daily News Michigan
kdame@mdn.net

Published: Saturday, July 4, 2009 11:16 PM EDT
His hard yellow-ringed stare is unnerving, light glinting off the pools of black in the center of his eyes.

Soon, those eyes will be looking down on the world again from the sky above, rather than out of the screened window of a flight pen at the Wildlife Recovery Association in western Midland County. The association receives injured raptors from all over Michigan, provides medical treatment and rehabilitation, then releases the birds.

Joe and Barb Rogers estimate the 18-year-old bald eagle — his age was determined from a band placed on one of his legs when he was about four months old — will be ready to return to the wild within a couple of weeks. Barb said she has not yet requested more detailed information from the band, such as where the eagle was banded.

The raptor was plucked from the wild after an early June phone call reported a bald eagle was resting on a stump in the river at the Chippewa Nature Center, unable to fly. “Even a bird with a broken wing can move a mile in one hour,” Joe said, explaining the urgency of reaching the destination quickly.

 

READ THE REST OF THE STORY HERE

http://ourmidland.com/articles/2009/07/04/local_news/doc4a4ebc213ebdd532140751.txt

 

 

 

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Senate hearing focuses on threats to wildlife

Conservation & Preservation

 

WASHINGTON (AP) - From a mysterious fungus attacking bats in the Northeast to the emergence of Burmese pythons in Florida, native wildlife is facing new threats throughout the country.

Protecting wildlife from new diseases and invasive species is a top challenge facing state and federal officials. Experts and public officials will talk about the threats - and ways to combat them - at a Senate hearing Wednesday.

Read rest of story here

 

 

http://news.lp.findlaw.com/ap/a/w/1153/07-08-2009/20090708030506_01.html

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Biologists begin monitoring collared jaguar

Conservation & Preservation

 

Animal determined to be oldest known jaguar in the wild

Early data received from the tracking device on the recently captured and collared jaguar in Arizona is already giving biologists a better understanding of the cat’s movement and foraging patterns.
  
 

With nearly a week’s worth of data, the Arizona Game and Fish Department noted that the jaguar moved several miles after collaring to a very high and rugged area that the cat has been known to use in southern Arizona. The animal has stayed in that general vicinity for a few days with apparent patterns of rest and visits to a nearby creek. During the collaring, the cat appeared to have just fed on prey, which will aid its recovery and allow it to go for a period of time without feeding. 
 

 Read rest of story here

 

http://www.azgfd.gov/artman/publish/article_1110.shtml

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