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 Forum Index > Eagle Nests Across North America - and the World > Other North American Eagle Cams
 Sequoyah NWR, OK - 2014 - 2017 - Bald Eagle Cam
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By: mia (offline) on Friday, March 06 2015 @ 01:33 PM EST  
mia

6 March, 2015
wave Cam is working again today.
Eggs alone.
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Parent (Mom?) returns.
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By: golden1 (offline) on Friday, March 20 2015 @ 10:24 AM EDT  
golden1

March 20, 2015

https://youtu.be/nAFGWSUDFCU This video shows what happened to one of the eggs on March 19, 2015

The other egg has been left alone for as much as 6 hours.

Report from Dr. Sherrod

The remaining egg appears to have been abandoned today.

Here are some thoughts about the incident from Sutton Center Director of Conservation Dr. Steve Sherrod:

Yesterday, March 18, was one of perplexing behavior by the eagles nesting at SNWR. Accounts captured on the cameras and witnessed by video observers show visible, independent movement in one or both eggs, with an apparent yellow blob beyond the top of one egg in the nest. The female that was incubating became upset, was vocalizing, left the nest, and returned with the male. At least one of the eggs appeared misshapen at that time, as if either hatching or partially broken. One of the adults then appears to pick up the misshapen egg in its beak and drop the egg over the edge of the nest. Incubation of the single egg left in the nest then continued, but today, March 19, the remaining egg has appeared unattended for over 6 hours at the time of this writing and will likely no longer be viable.

I have studied and maintained raptors for much of my life and have either hatched in captivity or have overseen captive hatching of nearly 300 bald eagle eggs and many more hundreds of peregrine, gyrfalcon, and prairie falcon eggs. Unfortunately, I cannot say with absolute confidence just exactly what happened yesterday with this bald eagle pair, but I have a reasonable idea. It is likely that at least one if not both 2014-2015 Sequoyah bald eagle eggs were hatching with almost completely developed chicks in the process of turning or rotating within and breaking out of the shell(s). Both captive breeding and wild breeding peregrine falcon adults have been observed, in rare cases, to pick at hatching eggs with their beaks, sometimes appearing to “assist” the young out of the egg shells. Usually, no “help” for the hatching chicks is exhibited or needed. On very rare occasions, adult falcons have been observed to continue picking at the cracked shells and actually into the hatching chicks, so that the latter are either killed or eaten by the adult. Older (about 2 week) peregrine chicks have been consumed by adult falcons in very rare instances as captured by nest cameras.

During the hatching process the chicks often, although not always, vocalize. A chick that is having trouble completing the rotational turn during hatching or in freeing itself from the shell halves can vocally protest rigorously. Also, a hatching chick that is sickly can remain inside, weak, and silently pass, or can protest vocally while continuing to struggle. This is especially true when the chick has a yolk sac infection, often resulting from bacteria invaded through pores in the egg shell. Such infections are usually fatal for the chick. Adults might react to the complaining chick by trying to brood it, feed it, or by eventually killing it, sometimes feeding the deceased chick to the other chicks in the nest or sometimes discarding the individual out of the nest. Such behavior might function to actually spread the infection or might serve as conservation of energy for the family group. If the second Sequoyah bald eagle egg ends up deserted, it could possibly be infected as well. We do know that when eggs are warm from incubation, and an adult must get off the eggs to eat or otherwise departs during a rain storm, the cold rain on top of dirty, but warm eggs, facilitates invasion by bacteria on the shell. (For that reason, we always clean eggs in captivity with a warmer solution than the temperature of the incubated egg). Without tests for disease in the deceased eggs/chicks, or without ability to hear chick vocalizations we can only speculate about what might have happened in this instance at Sequoyah, but the preceding scenario is likely.


2009 ~ Donna ~ Colorado


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By: mia (offline) on Friday, March 20 2015 @ 11:08 AM EDT  
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What a pity... Cry Hanky
Someone was sitting on the branch for a moment. Yesterday I only saw the egg alone, but sometimes there was someone on the branch too.
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By: IrishEyes (offline) on Friday, March 20 2015 @ 11:49 AM EDT  
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OMG! This is a lot to take in Cry,....i will have to read this again when I have more time.........

TY Donna for bringing this forward...... and

Big hugs to all who watched this nest...... Mom was so devoted to the eggs..although she had to leave them at times ..Cry Hanky I wish the adults better luck next season......love


RIP almost wee ones sadCry


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By: JudyB (offline) on Friday, March 20 2015 @ 12:49 PM EDT  
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Thanks for bringing the information here, Donna - and hug

I have to say that I'm amazed that the eggs survived so much time uncovered, some of it in very cold weather. It does seem that eagle eggs can handle the cold better than we thought, at least in some cases.

The 19th was day 40 for the first egg and day 36 or 37 for the second, so if they both showed some signs of hatching, they weren't really delayed that much by the time they were uncovered.

It's also possible that they weren't turned as frequently - which may have been a factor in the way the first egg was hatching (from what I could see, it was similar to the second chick at MN DNR, who managed to get out of the side of the egg without doing the usual chipping around the middle, something which may also have happened with #2 at Berry College, where the hatch occurred overnight, but the shell was not in two halves when it was removed).

The male visited the nest around 9:55 am, and either pecked at the egg or pulled straw over it - I think I'd better upload the video. There were two visits close together, and I haven't seen anything since then.

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Current view at 11:48 am

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By: IrishEyes (offline) on Friday, March 20 2015 @ 01:40 PM EDT  
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TY Judy....... I appreciate your comments and thoughts.... nature never ceases to amaze us......... I am sure we have all seen eggs that were rolled on a regular basis and never left uncovered for any great amt.of time and they didn't hatch ........ it is all very hard to understand ...... well.. it is for me........... i found this Mom very dedicated ..... but we all know she had to leave at times for food and potty breaks..........

12:30pm
No eagles in view....... egg the same.....

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By: JudyB (offline) on Friday, January 01 2016 @ 01:38 PM EST  
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Sequoyah NWR, OK - 2016 - Bald Eagle Cam

Welcome to the 2016 Nesting Season!

Note: I haven't decided whether to start a new thread for 2016 or continue the current thread - and I can't connect with the Sutton Center website or the cams to see if there's any update about anything there - so I'll post here and leave a couple of reserved posts so I can set up a new thread if there is activity. I think/hope there may have been a new/young pair at the nest last year - and I'm hoping they'll return this year with the instincts that were missing last year firmly locked in, and have a wonderful year.

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By: JudyB (offline) on Friday, January 01 2016 @ 01:38 PM EST  
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Reserved

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