The Forum Has Moved!

Please Join Us at https://forum.hancockwildlife.org
You'll need to register again - please use the same user name

See You There!


 Forum Index > Raptors Other than Eagles > Osprey
 Other Osprey Nests & News
 |  Printable Version
By: jazzel26 (offline) on Saturday, July 19 2014 @ 10:24 PM EDT  
jazzel26

Quote by: MaryF

3 entangled ospreys rescued by Mid-Columbia wildlife workers (somewhere in the Pacific Northwest)


An adult and two osprey chicks along the Snake River have been rescued by local wildlife workers after the adult became tangled in fishing netting last week.

It's the fifth time in three years that U.S. Fish and Wildlife has rescued osprey that would have died after becoming tangled in trash, usually discarded fishing line or netting, said Dan Haas, a biologist with the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

"Who knows how many are dying without ever being discovered?" Haas said.

Instances of owls becoming trapped in discarded fishing line along the Columbia River also have been reported in recent weeks, with a great horned owl dying on an island near Richland, according to Fish and Wildlife.

Research by the University of Montana has estimated that 10 percent of osprey die annually from entanglement in twine or fishing line. They and other birds may use twine or netting in their nests and can get a talon trapped in the nest, in addition to trailing caught line and getting tethered to branches.

"One discarded net ruined an entire nest," Haas said. "I don't think people realize just how deadly these materials can be to wildlife."


* Please be sure to read the story of the rescue--these folks went out of their way to save this osprey family!!

READ THE STORY HERE -- http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2014/07/1 ... rylink=cpy



MaryF, thank you for this posthug


Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 01/25/10
Posts: 1239
Falmouth MA

Profile Email Website PM
   
By: MaryF (offline) on Thursday, August 07 2014 @ 11:36 PM EDT  
MaryF

A very sad and concerning story about an osprey nest in Wisconsin from R.E.G.I. ---


Shot Adult Osprey and Fledgling Reunited in Rehab


Our work is like being on an emotional see-saw, you never know what the next call will bring. Several days ago we admitted an adult male Osprey. He had a serious wing/joint fracture. Due to the type and placement of the injury the osprey was likely shot from beneath, as he was in flight. The next day a call came into the clinic concerning osprey chicks from a well known Northern WI osprey nest. Residents of the area noticed the parent birds were not in attendance at the nest, nor were they the following day. The chicks by this time were calling urgently to be fed. Finally in desperation the chicks, still too young to fledge or leave the nest naturally...bolted from the nest to the ground below. One was hit by a car and killed while the other ended up in tall grass below the nest where it was found by a very caring family.

The family carefully took the chick to a safe location and called REGI. Once again we urged them to observe for the adults from the nest. They did, but no adults were seen.

The following day our volunteer Pilot Dave Piehler flew to get the chick and bring her to REGI for evaluation.
She arrived terrified and very hungry but apparently not injured.


READ THE REST+LOTS OF PHOTOS HERE -- https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set ... amp;type=1

--------------------------

All that's left of Mom Cry -- https://www.facebook.com/RaptorEducatio ... mp;theater
.



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 07/12/06
Posts: 12279
San Antonio, TX

Profile Email   PM
   
By: MaryF (offline) on Tuesday, August 12 2014 @ 10:58 PM EDT  
MaryF

Naturalist saddened by osprey find


CABLE - Pedaling happily along Lake Namakagon one warm evening, I caught a whiff of something dead on the breeze. Scanning the ditch, I soon saw the source: a mass of scraggly black and white feathers. Just ahead, perched on top of a utility pole was an osprey nest I've been watching all summer. It was silent and empty. My heart in my throat, I whipped around in a driveway and went to investigate.

Sure enough, the hooked, black beak of the large, fish-eating raptor lay among the wreckage. My heart sank—definitely an osprey.


Read the story here--more destruction by humans!!

http://www.postcrescent.com/story/sport ... /13946429/



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 07/12/06
Posts: 12279
San Antonio, TX

Profile Email   PM
   
By: Trudikk (offline) on Tuesday, August 26 2014 @ 01:20 AM EDT  
Trudikk

Quote by: jazzel26

Nice live stream osprey cam. Chestertown, MDGrin



CAM LINK
http://www.chestertownspy.com/osprey/


JAZZEL:hello:





This nest had 4 osplets to fledge 2014
I was a great cam to watch. I did not think the youngest would make it..was always last to get food..and mostly scraps, but it survived and seems to have done ok.
I will watch again next season.
Good cam there is a better link to it

www.tikilive.com/show/osprey-nest-of-kent-county


Birds of a feather flock together


Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 05/05/12
Posts: 213
Tucker, GA USA

Profile Email   PM
   
By: ConfusionCircle (offline) on Tuesday, August 26 2014 @ 07:06 AM EDT  
ConfusionCircle

Quote by: MaryF

Naturalist saddened by osprey find


CABLE - Pedaling happily along Lake Namakagon one warm evening, I caught a whiff of something dead on the breeze. Scanning the ditch, I soon saw the source: a mass of scraggly black and white feathers. Just ahead, perched on top of a utility pole was an osprey nest I've been watching all summer. It was silent and empty. My heart in my throat, I whipped around in a driveway and went to investigate.

Sure enough, the hooked, black beak of the large, fish-eating raptor lay among the wreckage. My heart sank—definitely an osprey.


Read the story here--more destruction by humans!!

http://www.postcrescent.com/story/sport ... /13946429/


What a horrifying story...made me angry!


Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 05/20/12
Posts: 109

Profile Email   PM
   
By: ConfusionCircle (offline) on Tuesday, August 26 2014 @ 07:12 AM EDT  
ConfusionCircle

It's over...both Osprey babies have fully fledged and seem to have permanently left the nest as of yesterday, Saturday, August 23. This nest is located in Harrison Mills, BC. I watched them grow from tiny little fuzzballs to these beautiful juveniles. Too bad the third baby died, but it was an absolute hoot documenting this family. I feel so sad...all of the Bald Eagle & Osprey babies I observed this year have all fledged, except for one last Osprey nest at the Great Blue Heron Reserve in Chilliwack.

Click on image to download

Click on image to download


Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 05/20/12
Posts: 109

Profile Email   PM
   
By: MaryF (offline) on Tuesday, September 23 2014 @ 12:00 AM EDT  
MaryF

Local firefighters save baby osprey Long Island, New York


Local firefighters rescued a baby osprey in Lloyd Neck this week, after it became entangled in a balloon ribbon and a fishing net that had been used to make a nest.


STORY + PICTURE HERE -- http://www.northshoreoflongisland.com/A ... sprey.html



Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 07/12/06
Posts: 12279
San Antonio, TX

Profile Email   PM
   
By: JudyB (offline) on Tuesday, November 11 2014 @ 03:14 PM EST  
JudyB

Thank you for the great pictures of the Harrison Mills osprey, ConfusionCircle - it looks like a lovely area!

I wanted to post some information about the Woods Hole Osprey Cam osprey family in Massachusetts, because they had a very unusual and stressful nesting season. The link to the website for the cam is http://www.whoi.edu/ospreycam/page.do?pid=41055 - and I do want to mention up front that while Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and Woods Hole Sea Grant are research organizations and concerned with environmental stewardship, the osprey cam is not a focus of their study but a gift they are providing to the community - they are not osprey experts, and I'm guessing most people who are involved with the organizations are too busy to even watch the cam most of the time. This is a nest that we observe on the Maine Window-on-Wildlife forum - the thread for the nest is http://www.window-on-wildlife.com/index.php?topic=86.0.

This is a nest I've been following since 2007, and after a few productive years, there were a couple of years when there seemed to be challenges for the nest, and either no one nested, or they weren't successful - so I was happy to hear that there were three chicks this year. I'd been looking in occasionally and seeing healthy looking chicks, but never watching for long - there are a lot of nests, and all looked OK during my quick peeks. Then on July 7, I got an email from jazzel, who is a regular on the WOW forum and is the local monitor for that nest (and 80 or so other osprey nests on Cape Cod), saying that the female had begun attacking the chicks, sort of like sibling rivalry attacks, some of which were quite vicious. The male was not as good a provider as many, and the female was also fishing for the nest (unusual for osprey - normally the male provides almost all the food for the female and chicks).

One factor that may (or may not) be related - a major hurricane struck the part of Cape Cod where the nest is located on July 4. At the very least, it would have disrupted fishing for a few days - and it's possible that the changes in atmospheric pressure (or other factors) may have had some effect on the female, though there were no reports of similar behavior at other nests there - or anywhere else where any of us have ever watched a cam, for that matter.

The female did also feed the chicks at times - and let them take fish away from her at times - and then would attack one or more, for no reason that was apparent to us as humans. There were enough questions that WHOI set up a page to discuss them - Latest Nest News and Updates.

In spite of all that, the chicks seemed to be getting enough food (though maybe not as much as on some other nests, but the third one wasn't far behind the other two in development, which suggests adequate food throughout the nesting period) - and all three fledged, the older two on July 25 and 27 and the third on July 30. It took a couple of days for them to get comfortable, and then they started doing a lot of coming and going. The female was coming to the nest less - and the male seemed to be increasing his fish deliveries. We began to relax a bit.

I'm not sure quite when it started, but there seemed to be more scuffles between the chicks. The chicks are referred to as F1, F2 and F3 (F for fledgling); F3 appears to be the youngest, and we don't know which is the oldest. They hatched a day apart, so near in age. F2 was known for occasionally attacking F3 (and not surprisingly, even though the youngest, F3 was the first to learn to fly out of the nest with a fish, to protect herself from attacks) - so we didn't think a lot about the scuffles. Until they got much more violent. Jazzel was at the site, and reported that there were 4 fledglings there - and it appears that the non-resident fledgling was attacking the resident fledglings.

Many of us - including jazzel - thought the intruder had actually killed one of the resident chicks August 5 - it was down and motionless as the intruder pecked at it and pulled out feathers from the neck and head area, and then it looked as if the intruder grabbed it and carried it off the nest (link to video - WARNING - very hard to watch). Happily jazzel was able to confirm that there were still 4 chicks in the area the following day - but the intruder was on the nest, which made it hard for the others to be fed. And the adults weren't often in sight, though it's likely they are off fishing.

One theory is that the intruder was not being fed (perhaps something happened to the male from his nest?) - and was acting out of desperation; chicks do know how to fish by instinct, but he may not have the flying skills yet to catch fish for himself (or herself - I'm not sure of the genders of any of the chicks). I think many of us became confused about the identities of the various fledglings at this point - they no longer were spending time together on the nest so we could compare markings, and there were often flurries of activity whenever more than one was there.

On August 10 jazzel found one of the fledglings dead under the tree where the female often perched; I don't believe a necropsy was performed, but she/he appeared seriously underweight, suggesting that he or she may have died of starvation. There was some initial confusion about the identity of the fledgling, but most of us now believe it was the youngest, F3, and believe that she/he had not been seen on the nest for at least several days.

It appears that the intruding fledgling left at some point, I think between August 6 and 10, but I'm not sure of that. I know that jazzel saw four fledglings in the area on August 6, and there seemed to be two fledglings visiting the nest after the 10th, and sometimes both spending time on the nest, suggesting that they might be resident siblings. Both adults were delivering food at this point - and the female was still occasionally attacking the fledglings.

The last confirmed sighting of the female was the morning of August 20 (almost certainly humanizing, but she seemed to take a long look at the nest and her offspring before leaving - and I have seen females at other nests spend more time than usual on the nest the last time they were seen). F2 was last seen August 24; there was a tussle between F1 and F2 over a fish delivery in which F1 grabbed F2 by the beak; F1 got the fish and F2 flew off after a few minutes - and that's the last time he (or maybe she) was seen on the nest, though jazzel saw both fledglings that evening. F2 seemed more advanced at flying, and had been flying for a month or so, so we suspect he either began his migration, or decided to hang out with other juvies down by the water and work on his fishing skills. We were a bit worried about F1 because she (or maybe he) never seemed to fly off with a fish to eat it elsewhere, and flying with fish is a skill fledglings usually work on - but she was being fed at the nest, and defending her food there, so perhaps she didn't see a reason to take her fish elsewhere (to use human terms). The last confirmed sighting of Dad was the evening of September 2, and the last confirmed sighting of F1 was the morning of September 3; F1 had a fish on the nest when the first observer checked the cam that morning, and we suspect that Dad brought it, so they may have left the area at about the same time.

We all have our fingers crossed for a much more peaceful nesting season in 2015 - though I suppose objectively this was a productive season as the adults raised three chicks to fledging, and two of them apparently survived to migrate. But I am hoping for a lot less drama in the future.

Forum

Status: offline

Registered: 07/12/06
Posts: 27335
Midcoast Maine, USA

Profile Email Website PM
   



 All times are EDT. The time is now 08:04 AM.
Normal Topic Normal Topic
Locked Topic Locked Topic
Sticky Topic Sticky Topic
New Post New Post
Sticky Topic W/ New Post Sticky Topic W/ New Post
Locked Topic W/ New Post Locked Topic W/ New Post
View Anonymous Posts 
Able to Post 
HTML Allowed 
Censored Content 

?

Please Donate

Please Donate!

Current & Ongoing Promotions

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Account





Sign up as a New User
Lost your password?