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 Forum Index > Conservation  > Wildlife News
 Wildlife Reports in the News
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By: Pat B (offline) on Thursday, February 03 2011 @ 10:05 AM EST  
Pat B

World’s oldest white-tailed eagle seen feeding on carcass

Submitted by Looduskalender on 3 February 2011 - 1:49am
Photo: Arne Ader
Translation: Liis


Click for a bigger picture.

The oldest known White Tailed Eagle has been spotted in Sweden!
The rings show that it is thirty years and seven months.
This bird has been recorded in various parts of Sweden since it was young – but not for the last thirteen years!

Kotkas – the oldest WTE in Estonia – is 25 – having been ringed by the founder of the Estonian Nature Protection Society!

Read the full Story Here



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By: Anonymous: CAL04 () on Friday, February 04 2011 @ 08:19 PM EST  
Anonymous: CAL04

"Animal Planet: After a 60-Year Absence, Harpy Eagles Return to Nest in Belize01/12/2011"
http://blogs.discovery.com/animal_news/ ... elize.html

Click on image to download

*

"planet green: Eagles Believed Extinct Found in Belize
by Jake Richardson - By Care2.com - Fri Feb 4, 2011 09:20"
http://planetgreen.discovery.com/travel ... elize.html

"Several Harpy eagles have been discovered in Belize’s Maya Mountains for the first time in 60 years. The eagles were believed extinct in the country, due to habitat loss and overhunting.

“This is incredibly significant for bird conservation in the region. It shows that our work in Belize is effective; protecting wildlife and habitat from overhunting and disturbance, while also sending a positive message about the benefits of conservation to the local communities,” said Lee McLoughlin, Protected Areas Manager for the Ya’axché Conservation Trust. (Source: Fauna-flora.org)

A pair of adult Harpy eagles and a chick were spotted inhabiting a nest. The fact they have reproduced should indicate they are healthy and have enough food sources to continue living a normal life span. There may be two other eagles in the same area, as one source said five were spotted by wildlife observers.

The newly discovered couple may be the most northerly breeding pair of Harpy eagles. The species also used to live as far north as Mexico, but it is thought they were mainly wiped out there. They may now only dwell in Chiapas, Oxaca and Veracruz in southern Mexico, but the populations are so small, they cannot be reliably confirmed.

The Maya mountains are believed to have some of the oldest rock formations in Central America. Some of them are estimated to be 200 million years old. The forested area is a good habitat for Harpy eagles. Some parts of the area are protected in a continuous corridor all the way to the Caribbean Sea. Other animals in these nature preserves are: jaguars, crocodiles, West Indian manatees, lobsters, conch, scarlet macaws and parrots. There are also 220 tree species and 350 bird species. Mahogany and cedar are some of the dominant trees, but these are highly sought for commercial value, and some were taken for industry during the 20th century. ...."





       
   
By: jwnix (offline) on Thursday, February 10 2011 @ 12:57 PM EST  
jwnix


Ultralight-led Whooping Crane Found Dead in Alabama
$6,000 Reward Offered for Information on the Killing of Whooping Crane 12-04

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is investigating the death of a whooping crane reported by an Alabama conservation officer at Weiss Lake, in Cherokee County Ala., on Jan. 28, 2011. The lake is located midway between Atlanta, Birmingham, and Chattanooga. Investigators believe the crane was shot.
The male whooping crane, designated 12-04, was equipped with a transmitter and leg bands to help track his movements. Trackers located it in January with other whooping cranes in a Cherokee County field not far from the lake where it was killed.

Scientists at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Laboratory in Ashland, Ore., are conducting a necropsy on the dead crane. It is the only lab in the world dedicated to crimes against wildlife.

Raised in Wisconsin at Necedah National Wildlife Refuge, whooping crane 12-04 learned how to migrate behind ultralight aircraft flown by Operation Migration.

Operation Migration is a partner with the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership, and for 10 years has lead between seven and 20 cranes per year on their first migration from Wisconsin to Florida to increase whooping crane numbers to recover this magnificent endangered species.

The bird made its first migration to the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Florida during the fall of 2004. It annually wintered in Florida until 2009. Since then it has spent winters on the marshes in and around Weiss Lake, Ala.

“We are extremely disappointed by the killing of this whooping crane,” said Jim Gale, Special Agent in Charge of Law Enforcement in the Service’s Southeast Region. “We recently lost three whooping cranes to gunfire in south Georgia, now this one in Alabama. This senseless killing has just got to stop.”

Gale has asked for the support of the public, especially the fishing, hunting, and boating community who may have seen or heard about the killing on Weiss Lake to help prosecute whoever shot this crane.

A $6,000 reward is being offered for information that leads to a conviction. To provide information, call Special Agent John Rawls at 334-285-9600, or e-mail him at john_rawls@fws.gov.

Several organizations are contributing to the reward including Operation Migration, which led this bird south with Ultralight aircraft on its first migration in 2004, The Turner Foundation, the International Crane Foundation, the Alabama Wildlife Federation, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

The Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership uses two techniques to establish the Eastern Migratory Population. One method trains cranes to follow costumed pilots flying ultralight aircraft from Wisconsin to Florida. The other releases young birds directly into wild populations of whooping cranes and sandhill cranes – called Direct Autumn Release.

Last spring, whooping crane 12-04 had paired with 27-05, the oldest Direct Autumn Release bird. The new couple successfully mated and had a late season nest with two eggs in Juneau County, Wis., south of Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. One egg hatched and the pair raised the chick for several weeks until it disappeared, presumably taken by a predator -- possibly a bobcat or coyote.

Captive whooping cranes produce Direct Autumn Release cranes at the International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wis. These eggs are hatched there, then raised in isolation by costumed caretakers for the first six weeks. Specialists then move them to an isolation facility in natural habitat on Necedah National Wildlife Refuge where costumed caretakers raise them. They are later released into the company of older whooping cranes around Necedah National Wildlife Refuge for the fall migration in November. They then follow those experienced whooping cranes and sandhill cranes, learning the migration route to the wintering habitat.

It has taken five years for the birds in the Direct Autumn Release program to learn to nest -- a milestone for the program that began in 2005.

The cranes are part of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership effort to reintroduce whooping cranes into the eastern United States. There are about 570 whooping cranes left in the world, 400 in the wild. There are about 100 cranes in the Eastern Migratory Population.

In addition to the Endangered Species Act, whooping cranes are protected by state laws and the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

For more information about the reintroduction effort, visit http://www.bringbackthecranes.org.

# # #


jwnix
Black Bear Conservation Coalition www.bbcc.org


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By: jwnix (offline) on Wednesday, February 16 2011 @ 10:12 PM EST  
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"For the first time in over 50 years WLF can confirm the presence of a FLOCK of Whooping Cranes in Louisiana!", Secretary Robert Barham


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Black Bear Conservation Coalition www.bbcc.org


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By: Pat B (offline) on Sunday, February 20 2011 @ 02:23 PM EST  
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That is brilliant news jwnix
They introduced some Cranes back into the Somerset Levels, SW England - and they seem to be doing well also! Grin



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By: Anonymous: CAL04 () on Sunday, February 20 2011 @ 02:33 PM EST  
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WCNC - Charlotte, NC:

"Credit: John Wendel
Eagles Savannah and Derek are caring for a clutch of eggs at the Carolina Raptor Center."

Click on image to download

"by NewsChannel 36 Staff
WCNC.com
Posted on February 16, 2011 at 3:10 PM
Gallery - See all 7 photos: http://www.wcnc.com/news/local/Eagle-Ca ... lery=y&c=y

HUNTERSVILLE, N.C. -- Expectant parents Savannah and Derek are enjoying the warmer weather this week.

Experts at the Carolina Raptor Center say they expect the eagles' eggs to hatch the first week of March.

NewsChannel 36 meteorologist John Wendel visited the Carolina Raptor Center Wednesday to check on the progress and snap some photos of Savannah and Derek.

So far, CRC staffers have not been able to determine how many eggs Savannah has laid.

A normal "clutch" of eggs has 1-3 eggs, and they predict that Savannah will be no different in this regard this year. In past years, Savannah has laid 2-3 eggs with as many as two eagles released into the wild.

Savannah laid her first egg of the eagle nesting season January 25."

WCNC - Charlotte, NC: http://www.wcnc.com/news/local/Eagle-Ca ... 39894.html





       
   
By: jwnix (offline) on Sunday, February 20 2011 @ 02:34 PM EST  
jwnix

do you know what species of crane? and it was also a reintroduction? I ve been intrigued at all that I have learned goes into making the decision to do this. and of course, once the decision is approved, then there is the work of enacting it.....and the joy of seeing them fly in years to come.....

Quote by: Pat B


They introduced some Cranes back into the Somerset Levels, SW England - and they seem to be doing well also! Grin


jwnix
Black Bear Conservation Coalition www.bbcc.org


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By: Pat B (offline) on Sunday, February 20 2011 @ 05:58 PM EST  
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Quote by: jwnix

do you know what species of crane? and it was also a reintroduction? I ve been intrigued at all that I have learned goes into making the decision to do this. and of course, once the decision is approved, then there is the work of enacting it.....and the joy of seeing them fly in years to come.....

Quote by: Pat B


They introduced some Cranes back into the Somerset Levels, SW England - and they seem to be doing well also! Grin



It was a true re-introduction!

First Cranes since the 16th Century



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