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 Forum Index > Conservation  > Wildlife News
 Eagle Deaths in the News
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By: elle (offline) on Saturday, February 19 2011 @ 12:27 PM EST  
elle

What the heck, Delphenium 101? First I have heard of such a thing, except when it comes to First Nations claiming thay have a right to hunt eagles as part of their culture ( which is nonsense,of course). But these discussions belong on another thread. I'll edit this post with the link when I find it.
HERE PERHAPS?


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By: Anonymous: Delphenium101 () on Saturday, February 19 2011 @ 01:03 PM EST  
Anonymous: Delphenium101

Quote by: elle

What the heck, Delphenium 101? First I have heard of such a thing, except when it comes to First Nations claiming thay have a right to hunt eagles as part of their culture ( which is nonsense,of course). But these discussions belong on another thread. I'll edit this post with the link when I find it.
HERE PERHAPS?



There has not been any activity in that thread since early 2010. I EMailed this article to several people and am hoping someone has printed it out.
Since it has been pulled...I will go to the source itself if need be. Surely this is a situation that should be addressed and debated.





       
   
By: Anonymous: CAL04 () on Thursday, March 31 2011 @ 12:43 PM EDT  
Anonymous: CAL04

http://www.wcnc.com/news/local/Bald-eag ... 89519.html

Click on image to download
"Credit: West Hills Veterinary Center, Henderson, N.C.
Bald eagle found shot along NC road
by NewsChannel 36 Staff
WCNC.com
Posted on March 31, 2011 at 10:56 AM
Updated today at 11:07 AM"

"WARREN COUNTY, N.C. – A $2,500 reward is being offered for information involving a bald eagle that was shot in Warren County.

The injured eagle was found along the side of the road on March 20. A veterinarian examined the eagle and determined that it was shot, and had a broken wing. Despite being treated for its injuries, the eagle died on Monday.

“Because the eagle was found along a traveled roadway, someone may have seen or heard something that will help in our investigation. We are hoping that anyone with information on who is responsible for shooting the eagle will step forward and provide information that will help us solve this case,” said Sandra Allred, a special agent for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service based in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Anyone with information concerning the shooting of this eagle is asked to call Special Agent Allred at 919-856-4786, or North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission Officer Richard Creech at 252-886-3614 or 252-438-3428.

Bald eagles are protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act."





       
   
By: MaryF (offline) on Thursday, April 28 2011 @ 03:13 PM EDT  
MaryF

Our member Delphenium101 refered me to an upsetting article concerning the killing of bald eagles. It's a good but maddening read!!!! Rant:


Click on image to download


Vancouver Island men accused of killing, selling bald eagles claim it is their right to do so


By LOUISE DICKSON, Timescolonist.com April 28, 2011



Two Vancouver Island aboriginal men who killed and sold bald eagles are claiming a constitutional right to do so.

In Duncan Thursday, provincial court Judge Michael Hubbard will decide whether First Nations members have an aboriginal right protected under the constitution to kill, possess and traffic in wildlife parts even though it is deemed illegal under the provincial Wildlife Act.




READ THE STORY HERE!!



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By: elle (offline) on Friday, July 01 2011 @ 03:05 PM EDT  
elle

I wasn't sure if I should post this article here but jkr says it is appropriate for this thread. The title " eagle killings" suggested to me deliberate deaths caused by man, such as shootings and poisonings etc.
Having said that, this article was in my local newspaper yesterday and is about an eagle that was killed by electrocution.


Electrocuted eagle starts a fire in Metchosin


By Larissa Johnston, Times Colonist June 30, 2011

There’s a dead, charred eagle sitting in the Metchosin fire station after the bird struck power lines, caught on fire and started a fire in a field.

On Wednesday afternoon around 4 p.m., some Metchosin residents lost power after hearing an explosion.

The smell of smoke led them to a fire on Rocky Point Road near Happy Valley Road.

“Once I got the fire under control, that’s when I noticed the charred eagle,” said Capt. Eric Meredith, a Metchosin firefighter.

The bird was about .6 metres from its head to talons, he guessed, and the wings were completely black and burned.

The bird’s wings, which would span about two metres, touched two separate power lines at once, making a circuit, said Metchosin fire chief Stephanie Dunlop.

Nobody witnessed the eagle’s unfortunate event, but this could only have happened if the eagle touched both power lines at the same time, firefighters said.

Because eagles are a protected species, any remaining feathers would have gone to the local First Nations.

But because the bird “burnt to a crisp,” said Dunlop, it will simply be discarded.

“Birds are around power lines all the time. It’s just a freak chance.”

ljohnston@timescolonist.com

© Copyright (c) The Victoria Times Colonist


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By: Pat B (offline) on Tuesday, November 08 2011 @ 08:06 AM EST  
Pat B

Rescue group calls on hunters to dump lead ammo
Fifth poisoned raptor euthanized
CBC News Posted: Nov 7, 2011 2:50 PM MT

click for larger image
Picture of a golden eagle euthanized by the Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton Monday. The bird was ill with lead poisoning, caused by the lead cartrige of a deer hunter, the group claims. (Supplied) Facebook

As Alberta hunters head to the bush for the fall season, a wildlife rescue agency hopes the death of a poisoned eagle will push hunters to stop using lead-based ammunition.

The Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of Edmonton said it was forced to euthanize a golden eagle Monday after it was found scavanging a deer carcass near Evansburg, Alta., about 1 ˝ hours west of Edmonton.

'It's devastating because it is 100 percent preventable.'
—Debra Jakubec, Wildlife Rehabilitation Society of EdmontonA hunter captured the bird, which had become weak, and brought it to the wildlife group's care centre near Edmonton.

Staff hoped the bird would survive, but it started to suffer violent seizures. A test revealed elevated levels of lead in the eagle, likely caused by a spent cartridge used by a deer hunter.

According to the group, lead shot was banned across Canada for waterfowl hunting in 1998, but some hunters still use it for big-game hunting.

Golden eagles are listed as a "sensitive" species by Alberta Fish and Wildlife, which means it is not at risk but may need special attention or protection to prevent it from becoming at risk. The birds nest in the mountains and foothills most of the year, and travel the prairies in winter.

Link to the full article



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By: elle (offline) on Thursday, December 01 2011 @ 05:58 PM EST  
elle

Vancouver Island eagle poachers sentenced to jail time, fine, and a ban
By Sarah Simpson, Cowichan Valley Citizen November 30, 2011


In April, provincial court Judge Michael Hubbard convicted Jerome Seymour of 16 of the 27 counts against him related to killing and selling 10 bald eagles, two swans and one kingfisher in Ladysmith, Duncan and Chilliwack between January and April 2006.


His cousin, William Seymour, was convicted of three of five like counts, occurring in April 2006 in Duncan. Both men claimed it was their aboriginal right to possess eagle parts.


In convicting the men, Hubbard dismissed defences of entrapment and aboriginal rights.


The sentencing of both man commenced Nov. 24, again before Hubbard, in a Duncan courtroom after a nearly five-month delay.


"I have concluded that the principles of denunciation and deterrence require me to impose a jail sentence as our precious wildlife must be protected-and a strong message sent," Hubbard said.


Believing the cousins undertook the activity for profit and not cultural reasons, the judge sentenced Jerome Seymour to three days imprisonment for each of the 16 counts against him, for a total of 48 days. The sentence will be served on weekends.


Jerome Seymour was also sentenced to the $1,310 fine and a three-year prohibition from possessing eagles, kingfishers, swans, or like birds and their parts, as well as to do 100 hours of community service in the next year.


In addition to three days imprisonment for each of the three counts against him, for a total of nine days, William Seymour received the same three-year prohibition and a fine of $200, as well as 50 hours of community service to be completed within one year.


Maximum penalties for the men were up to $50,000 or a term not to exceed six months, or both, for each offence.


Prior to Hubbard's decision, John Blackman, environmental Crown prosecutor for Vancouver Island, recommended a prison sentence of two years less a day for Jerome Seymour, in addition to a fine of $1,310 - an amount equal to the crown's estimation of the monetary benefits gained from the offences.


Blackman said in the space of three months and five days, Jerome Seymour committed 11 separate offences of trafficking wildlife and five of hunting out of season - all purely for financial gain.


Blackman called Jerome Seymour's attitude "callous and disrespectful" and that "no remorse has ever been expressed."


The Crown further recommended both Seymour cousins be prohibited from possessing eagles and their parts for 10 years, citing deterrence and "the continued insistence of both accused to have an inherent right to do what they did."


Blackman said "in less than 24 hours, William Seymour committed two counts of trafficking and one count of hunting out of season, which is essentially hunting for the purposes of trafficking."


He recommended 60 days imprisonment and a $200 fine - again, the crown's estimation of the monetary benefits gained from the offences.


Defence lawyer George Wool cautioned Hubbard not to fall victim to a double standard. He cited similar case law in which "white ranchers" in the Interior were given minimal fines by "almost apologetic" judges.


"Sentencing and punishment in law must be consistent," he said. "Inconsistency breeds disrespect. It troubles me to even think the Crown is saying it's a fine with court sympathy, but if you're aboriginal, no sir, you go to jail."


Wool went on to say that Jerome Seymour, in particular, was counselled into his actions by undercover agents, including conservation officer Richard Grindrod, who was later found to be defrauding his employer.


"Mr. Seymour was induced and counselled by a government agent to kill eagles." Wool urged Hubbard to sentence the men for "one eagle" because the rest of the kills were made as part of a "Crowndriven" agenda. Had it not been for the undercover sting, the Seymour cousins wouldn't be in front of the courts, Wool argued.


"These are not criminals," he said. "The Crown drove these people to do what they did," he added, noting his clients were "two unemployed, vulnerable young men" at the time.


"They've been victims of a misguided investigation. You can make an impoverished aboriginal do things because of his poverty and we in this courtroom will never understand that."


Wool is expected to appeal the sentence.



© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

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By: Pat B (offline) on Saturday, January 07 2012 @ 12:33 PM EST  
Pat B

GOLDEN EAGLES FACE EXTINCTION IN U.S. AS NUMBERS PLUMMET, NEW STUDIES REVEAL


“Wind farms are the main cause. The issuing of license to kill will accelerate the decline toward extinction.”—Save the Eagles International

An East County Magazine Special Report
By Miriam Raftery

January 6, 2012 (San Diego’s East County) – San Diego County’s 48 pairs of nesting golden eagles and even rarer bald eagles could be in peril if proposed industrial-scale wind farms are built. In a press release issued today, Save the Eagles International (STEI) issued a dire warning, providing detailed documentation proving that golden eagles and their nests are disappearing rapidly near wind farms across the U.S.

The group also blasted the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for changing its mission from protecting wildlife to “catering to the interests of an industry” that is a “ruinous one to boot.”


Eagle killed by wind turbine
Although the studies focused on golden eagles, if no major action is taken, wind turbines' razor-sharp blades will also threaten the existence of other species, STEI predicts.

The international group "solemnly warns the Western States that the biologically-blind policies will cause the extinction of the Golden Eagle, the California Condor, and other species of raptors.” Also at risk are species in Eastern and Central states, such as the Whooping Crane.

The evidence
This week, wildlife biologist Jim Wiegand, Vice President of SEI, examined park records and found that at least half of the golden eagles nests (5 of 10) in the vicinity of the Altamont Pass wind farm in northern California have disappeared since 2005. (Eagles mate for life and return to the same nest year after year. Wiegand provided detailed maps of former and current locations as evidence.)

But the devastation is far worse—and could quadruple in the near future. At Altamont alone, 116 golden eagles have been reported killed by the turbine blades each year. That’s 2,900 dead golden eagles over the wind farm’s 25 year history.

Now, regulators have approved reducing old turbines at Altamont with fewer but larger turbines that have bigger blade sweeps—doubling the power output in a move that “could be killing four times as many golden eagles as with the old turbines,” according to SEI.

New turbines such as those planned for East County tower hundreds of feet tall with blade spans as large as many jetliners—far larger than the existing turbines on tribal lands. Some are planned on National Forest and Bureau of Land Management lands that until a few years ago were protected as wilderness, but were opened up for energy development by the Bush administration, a step the Obama administration has not reversed but instead, used as an opportunity to fast-track numerous large-scale wind and solar projects in an effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and global warming.

Link to the Full Article and more photos





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