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 Forum Index > H.W.F. Goes Wild in the Schools > School Classrooms
 2009/10 Gordon Terrace Elementary -- Cranbrook BC
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By: SMW (offline) on Tuesday, June 22 2010 @ 09:34 PM EDT  
SMW

Today we were discussing birds that we had seen during our visits to Elizabeth Lake in the past year and came up with the following list: bald eagle, blue jay, Canada goose, chickadee, coot, crow, hawk, mallard duck, osprey, red winged blackbird, robin, yellow headed blackbird.


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By: JudyB (offline) on Tuesday, June 22 2010 @ 10:04 PM EDT  
JudyB

It looks as if the class had a wonderful - if very wet - trip to Elizabeth Lake!

And I'm amazed at how many birds you have seen there!

Another thing I find interesting is that we have many of the same birds here in Maine where I live, on the other side of North America. We don't have any yellow headed blackbirds here, and I don't think we have coots, but I have seen the rest near where I live. It is amazing that the same birds are found so far apart!

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By: SMW (offline) on Wednesday, June 23 2010 @ 12:05 AM EDT  
SMW

I thought Judy B. would be interested in these pictures showing coots, resting on submerged log

Click on image to download

and yellow headed blackbird. Both pictures were taken at Elizabeth Lake this year.

Click on image to download


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By: SMW (offline) on Wednesday, June 23 2010 @ 11:00 PM EDT  
SMW

This afternoon we listed all the mammals we have seen this year at Elizabeth Lake. Some of the students visit on weekends with their families and included what they saw then. Our list of mammals includes:
bear, beaver, Columbia ground squirrel, coyote, elk, moose, muskrat, skunk, squirrel, white tailed deer.

When I suggested we finish off with a list of plants, I little realized that they would come up with so many. It seemed that someone always had "one more" to add to our list which includes:
algae, blackthorn, cattail, choke cherry, dandelion, Douglas fir, grass, juniper, kinnikinnick, moss, mullein, ponderosa pine, potentilla, pussy willow, saskatoon, snowberry, trembling aspen, wild rose, yarrow.


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By: SMW (offline) on Saturday, June 26 2010 @ 02:05 PM EDT  
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In our last field trip of the year we followed the local creek, Joseph Creek, from Idlewild Park to the confluence where the creek flows into the St. Mary River. I've been taking students on this particular trip for the past five years. We usually play some water-related games, walk through the riparian zone along Rotary Way, and then drive to the St. Eugene Mission Resort, where my friend Bill has met us for a tour of the property by the river and creek to an area near a heron rookery. We got to see at least one of the herons which was in its nest high in a cottonwood tree close to the creek. This year there are seven nests. On the other side of the creek was an osprey nest. As we made our way through the tall grass we could hear the young calling. Then one of the students spotted one of the adults circling overhead. Shortly after we retreated to the trail where we caught sight of one of the adults on the nest. There was much to discuss over a hot dog lunch provided by the Resort. This trip is always a favorite with the children and unlike last year the weather was warm and sunny.
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By: SMW (offline) on Saturday, June 26 2010 @ 04:27 PM EDT  
SMW

We did make one last visit to Elizabeth Lake yesterday but this time for mini golf. However, as we walked close to Jim Smith Creek which flows out of the lake, a large group of geese, mainly mature goslings, gathered in front of us. As I slowly circled around the back of the class to get a picture, the geese turned around and walked straight towards me. Then I realized that they were expecting to be fed. It reminded me of a sign I had seen when visiting in Calgary. Yes, feeding bread to birds may be an age old tradition, but it's something we need to reconsider for the health of the birds!!
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By: JudyB (offline) on Sunday, June 27 2010 @ 10:19 AM EDT  
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Hi Mr. Wilson and students wave

Thank you for the pictures of the coots and the yellow-headed blackbird. I asked my husband about coots, and he said we do have them in Maine, so I may have seen them and not recognized them. He agreed that we didn't have yellow-headed blackbirds here.

How interesting to learn that there are lots of different animals at Elizabeth Lake as well - it seems to be a very busy area for wildlife.

We have bear, beaver and muskrats in Maine, but I don't think I've ever seen them. I have seen coyote, moose, skunk, squirrel and white-tailed deer, and we don't have elk or Columbia ground squirrels here. I have also actually seen raccoons in our kitchen! They adapt very well to a small town environment, and were able to come in our cat door! Needless to say, we rebuilt our cat door so the cats can still get in, but the raccoons cannot. They are an important part of the eco-system - but don't belong in a house!

That is a nice picture of the geese - and we do have lots of osprey in Maine! In fact, we're going to look at a local osprey nest later this afternoon. I'll try to take a picture to compare with the one you posted.

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By: SMW (offline) on Thursday, July 01 2010 @ 10:48 AM EDT  
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During the year we visited Elizabeth Lake on several occasions. We experienced how animals, plants and non-living things like sun, water, air, and soil play an important part in the wetland ecosystem, and we also learned about the web of life.

Here is a copy of A Kid's 2010 Guide to Elizabeth Lake.
Click on image to download
Click on image to download
Click on image to download


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