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 Forum Index > H.W.F. Goes Wild in the Schools > School Classrooms
 2010/11 Gordon Terrace Elementary School - Cranbrook,BC
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By: SMW (offline) on Monday, September 27 2010 @ 11:48 AM EDT  
SMW

Greg had some exciting news for me last Thursday at our School Open House. He told me about how he and his family had made homes for native bees which are being threatened by a variety of environmental factors. I asked him if he would be willing to write about it so I could post his story on this website. Here is what he wrote with a little help from his older sister:

"Last Saturday my sister, my mom and I were at Kootenay River Ranch just outside Canal Flats making homes for bees. We drilled holes in trees that were dead but not rotten. They faced east because the bees become active faster with the morning sun. The biggest holes were as big (wide) as your pinkie and the smallest were as big (wide) as a pencil lead. Holes in a live tree would grow in or be filled with sap. The holes must be drilled horizontal or water will fill them. Female eggs are laid at the back of the hole because they hatch later than the males. Male eggs are laid at the front and wait for females. I learned a lot about bees and that bees are harmless unless provoked."

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To learn more about this project check out:
http://www.invermere.com/2010/09/09/mak ... s-for-bees


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By: SMW (offline) on Tuesday, September 28 2010 @ 09:38 PM EDT  
SMW

Today it was windy but quite mild for late September. It was too good an opportunity to miss so, accompanied by a volunteer parent, we set off on a neighborhood walk.
When we returned to school, students were encouraged to draw a picture and write about the best part of the walk. Some of the comments included:
"We found two leaves. One was dark orange and the other one was light yellow."
"My favorite part on our field trip today was when me and my friend were walking back to school because we were flower girls because we were throwing leaves from side to side. It was fun."
"My rock is shiny and smooth. It is black and brown. The black is all over. The brown is stripes."
"The wind blew the leaves all over the place and I threw leaves up in the air."
"My favorite part of the field trip was the leaves. I got a blood red leaf. I collected six leaves. When the wind blows it looks like the leaves are dancing."
"When the wind blows the leaves, it looked like a tornado."
"My favorite thing about our field trip was collecting the leaves. On the way I noticed leaves were changing and shrivelling up and were also changing colour from green to yellow."
"My favorite part was running up the hill at Parkland because I had to run in long grass."


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By: SMW (offline) on Saturday, October 02 2010 @ 12:00 AM EDT  
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Today our class and Mrs. Bedell's grade 3 class had an unforgettable field trip to learn about the 3 Rs. First we visited the Transfer Station where everyone dropped off items to be recycled including newspapers, mixed paper, cardboard, tin, and plastics #1 to 6 in the yellow bins. Glass goes in a separate container.

Then it was off to the Recycling Centre where we saw what happens to all the recycled materials once the bins are emptied. Thanks to mechanization and people who sort the materials, paper, cardboard, tin and plastics are sorted then baled ready for transportation to large centres, where they are turned into recycled products. We also saw a large pile of crushed glass which is sent to Airdrie in Alberta. Afterwards it can be added to some paints used in marking centre lines on roads and highways, and, interestingly, it can also be found in sand traps on some golf courses.

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By: SMW (offline) on Saturday, October 02 2010 @ 12:21 AM EDT  
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Next we visited the Processing Plant where bottles, cans and juice containers are taken for recycling from all over the East and West Kootenays. The highlight was watching plastic bottles being shot from a pipe into a netted area before being ground into plastic chips. The can crusher was also impressive.

Our final destination was the Regional Landfill on the road to Fort Steele, where all the garbage in the local area is taken and buried. The landfill is divided into sections, and the whole operation is carefully managed to ensure that it will serve the area for up to 50 years. Each day several trailer loads of garbage are brought to the site, where a compactor crushes the contents, which are then buried under a layer of soil. Josie's Uncle Mark works the compactor. After each section is filled in, which may take several years, it is closed and a new site prepared in another area of the landfill. There is a great deal of recycling done at the landfill including making waste wood into wood chips for lining local walking trails. Garden and yard waste is composted. Piles of concrete, shingles, and tires will eventually be ground up and reused for a variety projects. It will be interesting to see what effect our field trip has once students and volunteer parents have had a chance to share their new knowledge with their families and friends.

Just as we were about to leave, we learned that there are up to six bald eagles in the area. We will investigate this further.

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By: SMW (offline) on Sunday, October 10 2010 @ 07:57 PM EDT  
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While driving past Foy Lake close to Lone Pine State Park in the Flathead Valley on the weekend, my wife told me to pull over. Something had caught her eye on the lake. As we watched, a bald eagle was attempting to dive on a small group of water fowl. Before I could get my camera focused, it flew off empty handed (taloned?) towards the far end of the lake and then disappeared behind some pine trees. As for the ducks, they appeared unharmed where they remained on the lake. On this occasion sticking together in a tight group on the water had kept them safe.


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By: SMW (offline) on Wednesday, October 13 2010 @ 05:47 PM EDT  
SMW

Today we read, discussed and drew pictures related to Wolf Island by Celia Godkin. This picture book tells how life on the island was in balance till the wolf family left when the pups clambered aboard a strange object to investigate, and the raft floated off into the lake. The adults swam out to be with the scared pups. Once the wolves were gone, there were no natural predators to keep the deer population down. As a result the deer ate most of the plants on the island. This affected the mice and rabbits because there was less food available, so there were fewer babies born to them that year. This in turn affected the owls and foxes who relied on the mice and rabbits for their food supply. Just when things were getting desperate during a particularly harsh winter, the lake began to freeze over. One day the wolf family was able to return to the island across the frozen lake. They hunted and killed the sick deer. When spring returned, it was not long before the plants began to grow back. This resulted in more food for the animals who relied on plants for food, which in turn resulted in a greater food source for predators like the wolves, owls and foxes. It was not long before life was back in balance.


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By: JudyB (offline) on Thursday, October 14 2010 @ 09:51 AM EDT  
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There is certainly a lot going on at the Gordon Terrace Elementary School!

Thank you, Greg, for telling us about making houses for bees. I've seen lots of bird houses - but I had never heard of bee houses before!

And thank you for all the pictures of the various ways that things can be recycled. I did not know that crushed glass is what makes the center lines in roads a little sparkly at night - and never would have guessed it was used as a fine sand for golf courses. And those huge piles and bales are amazing.

And interesting to know that you have found another place where eagles sometimes visit.

Thank you, Mr. Wilson and the GT Eaglets, for sharing your activities with us. Smile

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By: sassyk (offline) on Thursday, October 14 2010 @ 05:37 PM EDT  
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Thank You Mr. Wilson and the students at Gordon Terrace Elementary School in Cranbrook, for your most enjoyable reports on your field trips. I am learning a lot from your experiences, and hope you are as wellThank You


Never put both feet in your mouth at the same time, because
then you won't have a leg to stand on! ~ Author Unknown

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